status
still very gay for bro strider. doing pretty okay

bro shrine
found here! he is my darling forever
about
-male (ftm)
-he/him pronouns
-single
-homestuck garbage
-adorable
-sporadic blogger
-up for talking!

faq
right here!
(i dont get asked very many questions but hey heres this thing anyway because i mean whats a blog w/o an faq)
reblogged 4 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 6,110 notes
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reblogged 5 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 32 notes

amaxingmilk:

cool collected bro (◕‿◕✿)

hyperactive overdramatic bro (✿ ♥‿♥)

suave bro in polos and spats (✿◠‿◠)

sloppy bro in pajama pants (◡‿◡✿)

socially awkward nerdy bro ( ´∀`)

smooth flirtatious bro   (´ω`)

BRO  (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

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posted 5 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 0 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #selfie  
how did that girl even get on here shes so short and that dress is so ratchet who wears cheetah

how did that girl even get on here shes so short and that dress is so ratchet who wears cheetah

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reblogged 5 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 87,645 notes
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reblogged 5 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 18,661 notes
xdaringdamselx:

terezi-pie-rope:

[homestucks nodding as they reblog]

I swear I’ve never seen a fandom as chill about hate as Homestuck. Someone goes “HOMESTUCK SUCKS BLUH BLUH” and the Homestuck it’s directed at will just high-five them and go “DAMN STRAIGHT LOOK AT THIS BULLSHIT”

xdaringdamselx:

terezi-pie-rope:

[homestucks nodding as they reblog]

I swear I’ve never seen a fandom as chill about hate as Homestuck. Someone goes “HOMESTUCK SUCKS BLUH BLUH” and the Homestuck it’s directed at will just high-five them and go “DAMN STRAIGHT LOOK AT THIS BULLSHIT”

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reblogged 5 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 4,147 notes
captaincrapster:

Normally, I don’t think Rose would bother reading out loud to a group of jet lagged doofuses, but ‘tis the season…

captaincrapster:

Normally, I don’t think Rose would bother reading out loud to a group of jet lagged doofuses, but ‘tis the season…

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reblogged 6 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 112,962 notes

angry-lady:

when someone with no real authority over you tells you to do something

image

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reblogged 6 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 11,427 notes
jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

like
reblogged 6 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 24,740 notes
vasheren:

/blubbers/ i juST WANT THEM TO MEET

vasheren:

/blubbers/ i juST WANT THEM TO MEET

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reblogged 6 hours ago
22 Jul 2014 8,952 notes

casualcissexism:

i think the stupidest thing about refusing to use the right pronouns is youre not even proving anything. a woman isn’t going to stop her hrt because you called her a he. a dude isn’t going to just magically stop being a dude because you called him a she. nonbinary people arent just going to be like “oops, you got me” because you misgender them

literally all it is is a petty power trip and you are nothing but a petulant child

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